San Francisco Dog Trainer & Dog Behaviorist

Phone: (415) 643-3333

No Cone of Shame


no cone of shame

Musik sitting calmly with her soft cone the day after her surgery.


As many of you know, Musik got spayed yesterday as well as having 6 baby teeth extracted.  I wanted no cone cone of shame for my little girl!


If you’d like to keep up with her adventures, feel free to like her Facebook page Musik Ulbrich, or follow her on Instagram at @musikdog.


I went in search of cones before she had the surgery to see what my options were since the vet insisted that I’d have to have a cone on her (she wanted to sell me a cone of shame).


The traditional E-collar (“cone of shame “) is what most vets still use because they’re cheap and they work. They are also easy to clean and reuse.


no cone of shame

The largest “cone of shame” I’ve ever seen!


But they are not necessarily the best thing, and almost surely not the most comfortable thing for your dog.


There are a lot of collars shaped like the traditional E-collars that are made of softer material. And then there’s this collar that I chose which is a blowup collar which is more of a little cushion around the dog’s neck.


No matter what you use, please do check on your dog often to make sure they’re comfortable. Even this collar is hard on her neck after a bit. I’ve only used it when I’m not watching her for a minute.

Here are some quick tips…


First of all, get the collars and try them BEFORE surgery and get your dog used to them so it’s not a new thing on top of surgery recovery.

no cone of shame

Musik tried on the cone a few days BEFORE surgery to get used to it.


When you introduce it, give them cookies and do some commands and things to make them see that they can easily move around with it on and do not get scared or freeze and refuse to move.


I suggest having more than one type of collar so you can switch back-and-forth which will help keep the strain off their neck as well.


Make sure you have a collar on if you are not right there to keep them from licking any wounds. My vet told me that she has seen dogs lick open their stomach wounds and begin to eat their own intestines. I know that’s very gross 😱 but it’s important to know how critical it is to keep your dog away from their sutures!


And a general post-surgery tip… Realize that they will be nauseous and woozy from the anesthesia & other drugs for up to a couple days possibly, so be ready to try a few different types of food to ensure they’re nourished. Good food is a huge part of their recovery!


I hope these tips help you if and when your dog has to have surgery, and that you can assure no cone of shame for your pup as well!


no cone of shame

Don’t expect your dog to LOVE any collar – see the look I got when I was training Musik?  🙂


San Francisco, CA
Phone: 415-643-3333

Voted "Best Private Dog Trainer" in the entire San Francisco Bay Area! Three Times!

SF Chronicle



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